Lochlan Morrissey

{philosophy of language, game theory, public policy} guy

I am a policy researcher and lead data scientist at the Policy Innovation Hub at Griffith University, a PhD candidate in the School of Humanities, Languages and Social Science, and poetry editor at the Griffith Review. My main research interests include formal linguistics, narrative policy analysis, and applications of data science to public policy.

Find my CV here.

Contact
email: l.morrissey@griffith.edu.au (gpg key: 0xA7CE6B72)
phone: +61 (0)7 373 53249
in person: S07 (at Queensland College of Art), office 4.21
Elsewhere
ORCID: 0000-0003-1056-9607
git repos: git.lmorrissey.info/
coding projects: lochland.gitlab.io/
artistic portfolio: loch.land/
Recent (and recentish)
Alternative facts do exist. Interview on 3CR Wednesday Breakfast (begins at 51 minutes). 25 October, 2017.
La lingua più bella del mondo. Interview on SBS Radio Italian. 13 October, 2017.
Alternative facts do exist: Beliefs, lies and political reasoning. Griffith Review 57: Perils of Populism. 25 September, 2017.
Housing (un)affordability. Machinery of Government. 21 March, 2017.
Research projects
doctorate | linguistic signalling games in improvised theatre
supervisors: Andrea C. Schalley (KU), Claire Kennedy (GU), Anton Benz (ZAS)

This project offers a general, game theoretic model of the use of language in improvised theatre. The model views actors as game theoretic agents, that is, rational agents who select certain utterances, and certain interpretations of these utterances, by calculating the utterance or interpretation that will yield the greatest utility. It posits that the key problem that actors face is a steganographic problem, the study of which involves examination of situations in which hidden information is transmitted between trusted parties in such a way that the very presence of this information is hidden from unwarranted access. It proposes that the problem of actors trying to conceal information pertaining to their preferences regarding the plot trajectory from the audience is in essence the problem of parties attempting to conceal information so that its presence is undetectable.

ausEn and forced migration | an object-oriented semantics
collaborators: Andrea C. Schalley (KU)

Forced migration is a topic which attracts much attention from the Australian public, especially in political discourse. Three terms that are used frequently in such discussions are refugee, asylum seeker, and boat people. This project looks at the semantics of these terms, using an object-oriented model based on UML, first proposed by Schalley (2004). The findings are based on a large sample of text data of online comments on the first season (2011) of the SBS television programme Go Back To Where You Came From.

Research output
2017 On linguistic signalling games in improvised theatre
Lochlan Morrissey. PhD thesis. Griffith University: Brisbane, Australia. phd
A Lexical Semantics for Refugee, Asylum Seeker and Boat People in Australian English
Lochlan Morrissey, and Andrea C Schalley. In: Australian Journal of Linguistics 37(4), 389–423. ᴅᴏɪ: 10.1080/07268602.2017.1350130 aeform
2014 The ‘split agent’ problem (or McGonagall paradox) in improvised theatre
Lochlan Morrissey. Presented at: GCCR HDR Symposium 2014. Griffith University: Brisbane, Australia. pdf
Plasticity of nominal interpretations in context: An object–oriented approach
Lochlan Morrissey, and Andrea C Schalley. Presented at: CTF'14: Concept Types and Frames in Language, Cognition, and Science. Heinrich Heine Universität Düsseldorf: Düsseldorf, Germany. aeform
2013 Arundale’s face constitution as Bayesian game
Lochlan Morrissey. Presented at: ALS2013: The Conference of the Australian Linguistics Society. University of Melbourne: Melbourne, Australia. phd
2012 The semantics of three terms in Australian English: refugee, asylum seeker, and boat people
Lochlan Morrissey. Honours thesis. Griffith University: Brisbane, Australia. aeform
The semantics of three terms in Australian English: refugee, asylum seeker, and boat people
Lochlan Morrissey, and Andrea C Schalley. Presented at: ALS2012: The Conference of the Australian Linguistics Society. University of Western Australia: Perth, Australia. aeform
2011 Trolling is a art: Towards a schematic classification of intention in internet trolling
Lochlan Morrissey. In: Griffith Working Papers on Pragmatics and Intercultural Communication 3(2), 75–82.
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presentation book/thesis article